Overview
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The Passion

Jesus is King

John 18:37-38 - Therefore Pilate said to Him, "So You are a king?" Jesus answered, "You say correctly that I am a king. For this I have been born, and for this I have come into the world, to testify to the truth. Everyone who is of the truth hears My voice." Pilate said to Him, "What is truth?".
John 19:14 - And Pilate said to the Jews, "Behold, your King!".

In the narrative of the Gospel of John, the author uses pun intended on the names of people or locations to reinforce his message. Here Pilate represents the Greek philosopher Plato. Plato and the Greek philosophers were interested in finding what is truth.

"Who then are the true philosophers? Those who are lovers of the vision of truth." (Plato - Republic 475)

One important philosophical idea from Plato is the "Philosopher King":

"Until philosophers rule as kings or those who are now called kings and leading men genuinely and adequately philosophise, that is, until political power and philosophy entirely coincide, while the many natures who at present pursue either one exclusively are forcibly prevented from doing so, cities will have no rest from evils,... nor, I think, will the human race." (Plato - Republic 473c-d)

Here Jesus take the role of the "Philosopher King", King of the Jews. With this metaphor, the author of the Gospel of John shows that what Jesus is offering and who he is makes him the real leader of the Jews as opposed to the political and religious leaders of the Jews at that time.

Barabbas the robber

John 18:40 - So they cried out again, saying, "Not this Man, but Barabbas." Now Barabbas was a robber.

In the narrative of the Gospel of John, the author uses pun intended on the names of people or locationss to reinforce his message. Here on the name "Barabbas": in Sanskrit "bhara" means bearing, maintaining and "ābhās" means to appear, look like. "Barabbas" can be viewed as the substitute of Jesus.

In the Indian tradition the senses are compared to thieves and robbers. The ignorant mind, with its infinite afflictions, passions, and evils, is rooted in the three poisons: greed, anger, and delusion. The three poisons are present in our sense organs as kinds of consciousness or thieves. They're called thieves because they pass in and out of the gates of the senses, covet limitless possessions, and mask their true identity.

Barabbas can be viewed here as representing the forces of evils. And the Jews want the liberation of Barabbas in place of Jesus. As mentioned in the overview of the symbolism in the Gospel of John, the Jews represent the mind/personality of the body that is asssociated with the Land of Israel.

Jesus sitting on the Judgment Seat

John 19:2 - And the soldiers twisted together a crown of thorns and put it on His head, and put a purple robe on Him.
John 19:13 - Pilate brought Jesus out, and seated him on the judgment seat at a place called The Pavement, but in Hebrew, Gabbatha.

In the narrative of the Gospel of John, the author uses pun intended on the names of people or locations to reinforce his message. Here for the name "Gabbatha": In Sanskrit the word "gabha" means vulva and the word "ta" means womb.

We have here Jesus dressed in a purple robe, wearing a crown and seated on a throne symbolizing feminity. These are the symbols of a hieros gamos, a symbolic sacred marriage between the masculine and feminine. In Indian rituals, the King is made to sit on a throne which represents the womb. It is interesting to note that during the Eleusinian Mysteries, the initiates were wearing a purple robe, a crown and were seated on a throne. To be enthroned was synonymous with being initiated. This episode of the Gospel of John corresponds to the Sahasrara chakra of the Indian tradition where a throne is mentioned in the sacred texts.

The Golgotha

John 19:17 - They took Jesus, therefore, and He went out, bearing His own cross, to the place called the Place of a Skull, which is called in Hebrew, Golgotha.

The "Place of the Skull" is associated with the Sahasrara chakra of the Indian tradition located at the top of the cranium.

In the narrative of the Gospel of John, the author uses pun intended on the names of people or locations to reinforce his message. Here for the name "Golgotha": In Sanskrit the word "Gal" means to vanish, perish, pass away and the word "gata" means gone away, departed from the world, deceased.

The Seamless Tunic woven from the top throughout

John 19:23-24 - Then the soldiers, when they had crucified Jesus, took His outer garments and made four parts, a part to every soldier and also the tunic; now the tunic was seamless, woven from above throughout. So they said to one another, "Let us not tear it, but cast lots for it, to decide whose it shall be".

As mentioned in the overview of the symbolism in the Gospel of John, Jesus represents the serpent. The seamless tunic woven from above represents here the slough of the serpent. The slough that a snake periodically sheds is an important image in Hinduism. As early as the Brhadaranyaka Upanisad (4.4.7), the immortal self is said to discard its mortal body "like a serpent sheds its slough." It is interesting to note that the tunic is mentioned in the narrative as seamless and wowen from above just like the way the serpent sheds his slough: in one piece and starting from the head all the way down to the tail.

The original Greek word for the English "from above" (From above) is the same word used in John 3:3:

John 3:3 - Jesus said to Nicodemus, "Truly, truly, I say to you, unless one is born from above he cannot see the kingdom of God.".

In both the "Seamless tunic" and the Nicodemus narratives, the word "from above" symbolizes death and rebirthing.

Joseph of Arimathea and Nicodemus

John 19:38-40 - After these things Joseph of Arimathea, being a disciple of Jesus, but a secret one for fear of the Jews, asked Pilate that he might take away the body of Jesus; and Pilate granted permission. So he came and took away His body. Nicodemus, who had first come to Him by night, also came, bringing a mixture of myrrh and aloes, about a hundred pounds weight. So they took the body of Jesus and bound it in linen wrappings with the spices, as is the burial custom of the Jews.

In the narrative of the Gospel of John, the author uses pun intended on the names of people or locations to reinforce his message. Here Nicodemus stands for the Greek mathematician Nicomachus, a Neopythagorean, living at the time of Jesus known for his works "Introduction to Arithmetic".

The name Joseph means "to add" and Arimathea stands for Arithmetic (arithmetic).

Myrrh stands for Smyrna, a prominent city of the Greek world close to Ephesus in Turkey and aloes is a plant found in India. The symbol of the "mixture of myrrh and Aloes" represents, respectively, the Greek/Jewish and Indian influences used in the narrative of the Gospel of John.

The body of Jesus represents the text of the Gospel of John from the first word to the last (As mentioned in the overview of the symbolism in the Gospel of John, the text narrative of the Gospel is a body).

The meaning of the symbolism here is the following: Nicomachus, the father of arithmetic, creates the text of the Gospel of John by mixing influences from the Greek/Jewish world and Indian spirituality. And he add arithmetic to the narrative.

It is interesting to note the use of arithmetic in the narrative by the author of the Gospel of John. View the numerology associated with the narrative.

The tomb

John 19:41 Now in the place where He was crucified there was a garden, and in the garden a new tomb in which no one had yet been laid.
Brahmarandhra, meaning "cave of Brahman", is a hole at the crown of the head. This hole is where is located the door of Brahma, ‘Brahma Dwara’ - the ‘Door to Pure Consciousness’. In the Indian tradition the cave is associated with the cranial vault of the yogi at the crown of the head:
A mountain cave is the macrocosmic replica of the cranial vault of the meditating yogin, the tumulus (samadhi) in which deceased yogins are interred. David Gordon White, The Alchemical Body

When the Yogi separates himself from the physical body at the time of death, Brahmarandhra bursts open and the individual soul comes out through this opening (Kapala Moksha). The soul is liberated from its bondage and doesn't come back for a rebirth.