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The Wedding at Cana

John 2:1-10 
1. On the third day there was a wedding in Cana of Galilee, and the mother of Jesus was there; 2. and both Jesus and His disciples were invited to the wedding. 3. When the wine ran out, the mother of Jesus said to Him, “They have no wine.” 4. And Jesus said to her, “Woman, what does that have to do with us? My hour has not yet come.” 5. His mother said to the servants, “Whatever He says to you, do it.” 6. Now there were six stone waterpots set there for the Jewish custom of purification, containing twenty or thirty gallons each. 7. Jesus said to them, “Fill the waterpots with water.” So they filled them up to the brim. 8. And He said to them, “Draw some out now and take it to the headwaiter.” So they took it to him. 9. When the headwaiter tasted the water which had become wine, and did not know where it came from (but the servants who had drawn the water knew), the headwaiter called the bridegroom, 10. and said to him, “Every man serves the good wine first, and when the people have drunk freely, then he serves the poorer wine; but you have kept the good wine until now.”

The miracle of the Wedding at Cana corresponds to the Svadhisthana Chakra of the Indian tradition. Svadhisthana Chakra is associated with the element water (corresponding to the water turned wine), the sense of taste (the headwaiter tasting the wine). Svadhisthana Chakra has six red petals corresponding to the six stone waterpots filled with wine.

The symbol of the Water jars

John 2:6-7 - Now there were six stone water pots set there for the Jewish custom of purification, containing two or three firkins apiece. Jesus said to them, “Fill the water pots with water.” So they filled them up to the brim.

The water jar (kamandalu) is one of the eight basic sacred symbols of Hinduism.

The symbol of the water jar originates from one of the most important text of Hinduism: the churning of the Ocean of milk. Out of the water of the ocean appears a jar filled to the brim with the nectar of immortality carried by the goddess Varuni. Varuni is the goddess of wine and intoxication in Hindu mythology. She represents the purifying nectar of immortality (amrita). On the microcosmic level, the ocean/water is a symbol of the human body and the wine is a symbol of the nectar of immortality. The waters of the lower body will eventually be turned into the Living Waters of the upper body (the wine/nectar of immortality).

A water jar in India is also called ghata which refers both to the clay vessel and to the vessel called the body. In the process of the raising of the Kundalini, as the water is raised along the length of the medial Sushumna nadi, it is transformed into nectar. This process is consummated in the empty space (kha), called Brahma Randhra, of the uppermost Sahasrara chakra located in the cranial vault. Here, the yogin who fills the kha (the ether of the cranial vault) with water transformed into nectar gains bodily immortality. When allowed to flow back downwards, the nectar of immortality floods the yogin's body.

The symbol of the wedding

John 2:1-2 - On the third day there was a wedding in Cana of Galilee, and the mother of Jesus was there; and both Jesus and His disciples were invited to the wedding.

In the Indian tradition, the process of involution occurring within the body is like a wedding (sandhya). The bride (Kundalini Shakti) enters into Sushumna (the central nadi), pierces the first six chakras and finally meets and embraces the bridegroom (Siva) in the last chakra at the crown of the head. By this embrace, they make floods of nectar of immortality flow.

The Water turned into Wine

John 2:8-10 - And He said to them, “Draw some out now and take it to the headwaiter.” So they took it to him. When the headwaiter tasted the water which had become wine, and did not know where it came from (but the servants who had drawn the water knew), the headwaiter called the bridegroom, and said to him, “Every man serves the good wine first, and when the people have drunk freely, then he serves the poorer wine; but you have kept the good wine until now.”

In the Indian tradition, the water contained in a jar represents the nectar of immortality (Amrita) - the elixir of life. The wine represents Madya, one of the 5 Ms of the Panchamakara. In the symbolism of the Panchamakara, the wine (madya) stands for the nectar of immortality that is said to ooze down from the thousand-petaled lotus at the crown of the head.

The good wine as the nectar of immortality

John 2:10 
The headwaiter said to him, “Every
man serves the good wine first, and
when the people have drunk freely,
then he serves the poorer wine; but
you have kept the good wine until now.”
Bhagavad Gita 18:37-38 
"That which in the beginning may be just like poison but at the end is just like nectar and which awakens one to self-realization is said to be happiness in the mode of goodness. That happiness which is derived from contact of the senses with their objects and which appears like nectar at first but poison at the end is said to be of the nature of passion."

The good wine in the Wedding at Cana represents the nectar that results from the awakening to self-realization. The pursuit of self-realization is very difficult, bitter like poison, but if one eventually achieves liberation, he begins to drink real nectar, and he enjoys life.

The poorer wine represents the enjoyment perceived as pleasurable coming from the senses. The enjoyments coming from the passion of the senses seem pleasurable at first but do not last and eventually will not be satisfying.

The symbol of the name Cana

John 2:1 - On the third day there was a wedding in Cana of Galilee

In the narrative of the Gospel of John, the author uses pun intended on the names of people or locations to reinforce his message. In Sanskrit Kha means empty space and Na means no/not, referring to the empty water pots being filled with water transformed into wine. It also refers to the successful filling up of the empty space (Kha) in the cranial vault with water transformed into nectar.

Jesus go down from Cana to Capharnaum after the miracle

John 2:12 - After this He went down to Capharnaum, with His mother, His brothers and His disciples.

The Wedding at Cana corresponds to the Svadhisthana Chakra.
The movement of Svadhisthana is down corresponding to the movement of the water element.

The symbolism of the wedding at Cana represents the yogic process by which the adept turns inwards and unifies the kundalini sakti with Siva in the crown of the head after piercing the first six chakras. The wine corresponds to the nectar of immortality emitted at the top of the head once this process is completed.